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News Weidinger studies ecocriticism in 19th-century art

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Landscape painting of buildings with smoakstacks emitting pollution into the sky.

​Constantin Meunier, "In the Black Country, 1893 (Wikimedia Commons)

​Alumna Corina Weidinger recently published "Picturing Industrial Landscapes: Ecocriticism in Constantin Meunier's and Maximilien Luce's Paintings of Belgium's Black Country," in "Ecocriticism and the Anthropocene in Nineteenth-Century Art and Visual Culture." In her essay, Weidinger explains the artists' emphasis on the visible harm of pollution, which contradicts the western canon of portraying pollution as a symbol of human superiority.

This Page Last Modified On: 2/21/2020 1:00 PM
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Alumna Corina Weidinger recently published an essay in "Ecocriticism and the Anthropocene in Nineteenth-Century Art and Visual Culture."

​Alumna Corina Weidinger recently published an essay in "Ecocriticism and the Anthropocene in Nineteenth-Century Art and Visual Culture."

2/28/2020
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  • Department of Art History
  • University of Delaware
  • 318 Old College
  • Newark, DE 19716 USA
  • Phone: 302-831-8415
  • arthistory@udel.edu