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FACULTY Faculty

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  • Ann E. Gibson, Professor Emerita

    Professor Emerita
    Modern and Contemporary Art
    Ph.D. University of Delaware
    University of Delaware
    Newark, DE 19716

    Biography

    Professor Gibson writes on Modern and Contemporary art and is best known for her work on Abstract Expressionism. She holds an M.A. in Ceramics from Kent State University and taught studio art for ten years before beginning her M.A. in Art History at the University of Pittsburgh, where she received the Distinguished Alumna Award for 1995. She received her Ph.D. in 1984 from the University of Delaware and has taught at the University of Pittsburgh, Yale University, the State University of New York, Stony Brook, and UCLA, and has held fellowships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art, the Smithsonian, and the Getty Research Institute.

    Interested in the interaction of vision and language in the production of culture and identity, Gibson meshes ideas from fields such as literature, psychology, anthropology, and philosophy with close examination of popular culture as well as works of art to look at how art affects culture and how culture is reflected in art. She specializes in art after World War II, teaching courses in Semiotics, Abstraction, Allegory, Cross-Cultural Art, Pop Art, Minimalism, Feminist Theory and Contemporary Women's Art, and Postmodernism.

    Gibson is the author of Issues in Abstract Expressionism: The Artist-Run Periodicals (1990) and Abstract Expressionism: Other Politics (1997). She co-curated Judith Godwin, Style and Grace for the Museum of West Virginia (1997) and Norman Lewis: The Black Paintings, 1946-1977, at the Studio Museum in Harlem (1998). She has written catalogue essays for exhibitions at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, the New Jersey State Museum, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Kenkeleba Gallery and the New Museum, and the Kunstmuseum Basel. With Stephen Polcari she guest-edited an issue of the Art Journal, and her articles have appeared in journals such as Studio InternationalKunstforumThe International Review of African American ArtArtforumAmerican ArtGendersThe Journal of HomosexualityYale Journal of CriticismArts Magazine, and Third Text, and anthologies published by the University of Chicago, Cambridge University Press, Harper Collins, and the University of Liverpool Press.

 

 

Newark, DE 19716<div class="ExternalClassE9CA3D50C32D4B128ACCFEC1B71D3AAB"><p>Professor Gibson writes on Modern and Contemporary art and is best known for her work on Abstract Expressionism. She holds an M.A. in Ceramics from Kent State University and taught studio art for ten years before beginning her M.A. in Art History at the University of Pittsburgh, where she received the Distinguished Alumna Award for 1995. She received her Ph.D. in 1984 from the University of Delaware and has taught at the University of Pittsburgh, Yale University, the State University of New York, Stony Brook, and UCLA, and has held fellowships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art, the Smithsonian, and the Getty Research Institute.</p><p>Interested in the interaction of vision and language in the production of culture and identity, Gibson meshes ideas from fields such as literature, psychology, anthropology, and philosophy with close examination of popular culture as well as works of art to look at how art affects culture and how culture is reflected in art. She specializes in art after World War II, teaching courses in Semiotics, Abstraction, Allegory, Cross-Cultural Art, Pop Art, Minimalism, Feminist Theory and Contemporary Women's Art, and Postmodernism.</p><p>Gibson is the author of <em>Issues in Abstract Expressionism: The Artist-Run Periodicals</em> (1990) and <em>Abstract Expressionism: Other Politics</em> (1997). She co-curated <em>Judith Godwin, Style and Grace</em> for the Museum of West Virginia (1997) and <em>Norman Lewis: The Black Paintings, 1946-1977</em>, at the Studio Museum in Harlem (1998). She has written catalogue essays for exhibitions at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, the New Jersey State Museum, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Kenkeleba Gallery and the New Museum, and the Kunstmuseum Basel. With Stephen Polcari she guest-edited an issue of the <em>Art Journal</em>, and her articles have appeared in journals such as <em>Studio International</em>, <em>Kunstforum</em>, <em>The International Review of African American Art</em>, <em>Artforum</em>, <em>American Art</em>, <em>Genders</em>, <em>The Journal of Homosexuality</em>, <em>Yale Journal of Criticism</em>, <em>Arts Magazine</em>, and <em>Third Text</em>, and anthologies published by the University of Chicago, Cambridge University Press, Harper Collins, and the University of Liverpool Press.</p></div>agibson@udel.eduGibson, Ann E.<img alt="Ann E. Gibson" src="/Images%20Bios/People/Faculty/gibson-bio.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />Professor EmeritaModern and Contemporary ArtPh.D. University of Delaware

 

 

Abstract Expressionism: Other PoliticsGibson, Ann E.Yale University PressNew Haven, CT1997https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300080728/abstract-expressionism<p>The Abstract Expressionist movement has long been bound up in the careers and lifestyles of about twelve white male artists who exhibited in New York in the 1940s. In this book Ann Eden Gibson reconsiders the history of the movement by investigating other artists—people of color, women, and gays and lesbians—whose versions of abstraction have been largely ignored until now.</p><p>Gibson argues that the origins and promotion of Abstract Expressionism were influenced by sexual and racial biases, and she shows how both the themes and physical appearance of Abstract Expressionism were gradually defined and refined by the white male artists who became its spokesmen, by critics, and by private and institutional supporters. She offers a justification for rethinking the definition of Abstract Expressionism through the work of such well-known contemporaries as Romare Bearden, Louise Bourgeois, Lee Krasner, Norman Lewis, Alfonso Ossorio, Aaron Siskind, Leon Polk Smith, Anne Ryan, and Hale Woodruff, as well as such lesser known artists as Ruth Abrams, Ronald Joseph, and Thelma Johnson Streat. Gibson contends that the current description of Abstract Expressionism has not only deprived it of such themes as masking, maternity, domesticity, and the experience of African American and Native American culture but has also limited it formally by excluding smaller, representational, and more personal work by canonical as well as noncanonical artists. She demonstrates that exposing the movement's true diversity makes this important heritage even more valuable than it was before.<br></p>
Issues in Abstract Expressionism: The Artist-Run PeriodicalsGibson, Ann E.UMIAnn Arbor, MI1990https://www.amazon.com/Issues-Abstract-Expressionism-Periodicals-AVANT-GARDE/dp/0835719448<p> <em>Issues in Abstract Expressionism: The Artist-Run Periodicals</em> is a tripartite exploration and documentation of the history of the New York School as represented in five interdisciplinary periodicals that appeared in the late 1940s and early 1950s: <em>Iconograph</em>, <em>The Tiger's Eye</em>, <em>Possibilities</em>, <em>Instead</em>, and <em>Modern Artists in America</em>.<br></p>

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  • Department of Art History
  • University of Delaware
  • 318 Old College
  • Newark, DE 19716 USA
  • Phone: 302-831-8415
  • arthistory@udel.edu