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American revolutionary soldiers, assisted by free blacks and slaves, pulling down the statue of King George III at Broadway and Bowling Green, in New York.

​Balthasar Friedrich Leizelt, "Destruction of the Royal Statue in New York," 1771-81.

​Professor Wendy Bellion​ recently spoke with National Geographic Magazine about iconoclasm involving statues, a practice that dates back to the American Revolution in the United States. On July 9, 1776, colonial protestors toppled a statue of King George III in Manhattan’s Bowling Green Park. This was just one of many actions taken against British symbols at the time. In the article, entitled "Pulling Down Statues? It's a Tradition that Dates Back to U.S. Independence," Bellion notes that the destruction of statues throughout history is "not wholly or principally an act of erasure."

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Professor Wendy Bellion recently spoke with National Geographic about iconoclasm involving statues, which dates back to the American Revolution.

​Professor Wendy Bellion recently spoke with National Geographic about iconoclasm involving statues, which dates back to the American Revolution.

7/8/2020
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Bellion featured in National Geographic
Wendy Bellion, University of Delaware, art history, faculty, National Geographic, statues, iconoclasm
  • Department of Art History
  • University of Delaware
  • 318 Old College
  • Newark, DE 19716 USA
  • Phone: 302-831-8415
  • arthistory@udel.edu