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  • Feb
    1
    Spotlight Gallery Conversation
    Feb. 1st, 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM
    Philadelphia Museum of Art
    This week, doctoral candidate Caitlin Hutchison will lead a series of in-depth public conversations on artwork in the Philadelphia Museum of Art​ as a part of the 'Spotlight' program. Join her Feb. 1-3 at 11 am each day at the PMA where she will be discussing a Sasanian Portal from the mid-6th century. 
  • Feb
    2
    Spotlight Gallery Conversation
    Feb. 2nd, 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM
    Philadelphia Museum of Art
    This week, doctoral candidate Caitlin Hutchison will lead a series of in-depth public conversations on artwork in the Philadelphia Museum of Art​ as a part of the 'Spotlight' program. Join her Feb. 1-3 at 11 am each day at the PMA where she will be discussing a Sasanian Portal from the mid-6th century. 
  • Feb
    3
    Spotlight Gallery Conversation
    Feb. 3rd, 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM
    Philadelphia Museum of Art
    This week, doctoral candidate Caitlin Hutchison will lead a series of in-depth public conversations on artwork in the Philadelphia Museum of Art​ as a part of the 'Spotlight' program. Join her Feb. 1-3 at 11 am each day at the PMA where she will be discussing a Sasanian Portal from the mid-6th century. 
  • Feb
    6
    Opening: "Parallel Visions, Parallel Lives"
    Feb. 6th, 12:00 AM to 11:59 PM
    Recitation Hall Gallery
    For the month of February the University of Delaware will be hosting work produced in the Prison Arts Program and the art of Roy Hickman, a former participant in the Program. This Program consists of a series of art classes supervised by a Department of Corrections employee and taught by an inmate art instructor. Once completed, the work is then sold with 70% of the proceeds from each sale deposited into the artist’s commissary account and the remaining 30% used to fund the Program. This exhibition and its accompanying programming seeks to expand our understanding of the local art scene to include the state’s incarcerated population and challenge Delaware’s artistic community to support those who have been or are currently imprisoned. The exhibition will close on March 2. Please join us Gallery for a reception with the artist Roy Hickman beginning at 5:30 pm in Recitation Hall. At 6 pm Mr. Hickman and the curator, University of Delaware graduate student Bridget Killian, will be in conversation in Old College Room 211. The reception will continue afterwards in the Gallery. 
  • Feb
    6
    A Conversation with Artist Roy Hickman
    Feb. 6th, 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM
    Old College Room 211, Recitation Hall Gallery
    For the month of February the University of Delaware will be hosting work produced in the Prison Arts Program and the art of Roy Hickman, a former participant in the Program. Mr. Hickman and the curator of this exhibition, University of Delaware graduate student Bridget Killian, will be in conversation in Old College Room 211. The reception will continue afterwards in the Recitation Hall Gallery.  
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  • Emily Casey
    Assistant Professor of Art History, Saint Mary's College of Maryland

    ​As an assistant professor of art history at the public honors college of the state of Maryland, I take part in shaping a dynamic and intimate curriculum that places art history at the heart of an undergraduate liberal arts education. While I have a strong belief in the value of the small liberal arts college, my time at the University of Delaware instilled in me a respect and value for the opportunities and support of a state-funded, public institution. After graduating from UD, it felt right to me to join an institution that comprises the best of both. At Saint Mary's, my classes explore the art and material culture of the early modern Atlantic world. While I was trained at the University of Delaware as an Americanist, this focus in my teaching grows from my experience in the program. Working with Wendy Bellion and Monica Dominguez Torres, as well as professors in the English department, and curators and faculty at Winterthur, I expanded my notion of what belonged in a study of American art, and developed an interest in the colonial world that crossed national boundaries between the US, Mexico, South America, and the Caribbean. As a teacher, I am excited to expand my scope even further by looking across the Atlantic to show how a study of visual and material culture can illuminate the production of an early modern global culture shaped by the interactions between people in West Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Americas. As a graduate student, the opportunities to do internships at area museums--often with other UD alums--also sparked in me a commitment to curatorial and museum work. At Saint Mary's, I am excited to share this interest with my students by organizing field trips to mid-Atlantic museums, teaching in the Museum Studies program, and drawing from the small campus collection in my teaching.

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  • Jennifer Stettler Parsons
    Assistant Curator, Florence Griswold Museum

    ​My career as an art historian and museum professional began when I chose to major in Art History at the University of Delaware. As part of my undergraduate experience I studied abroad in Paris, participated in the Curatorial Apprenticeship Program (then led by Jan Broske, Curator of Collections at the University Art Gallery), and completed an internship at the Delaware Art Museum. After graduating in 2006 with a B.A. in Art History and a minor in French, I went on to earn an M.A. in Art History from George Washington University. While in D.C. I interned with curators at the Phillips Collection, which confirmed my love of research and curatorial work. Before pursuing my Ph.D. I gained additional experience working at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the Executive Office, Registrars' Office, and Special Exhibitions department. In 2010 I began working toward my Ph.D. in Art and Architectural History at the University of Virginia under the guidance of Elizabeth Hutton Turner, specializing in American and modern art. My first seminar paper won the inaugural Archives of American Art Graduate Research Essay Prize. While writing my dissertation, "John Sloan: Between Philadelphia and New York," I pursued fellowships that would grant me additional museum experience. I first interned at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and then returned to the PMA as a Barra Fellow in American Art, before completing my degree as Sara Roby Predoctoral Fellow in Twentieth-Century American Realism at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. I am currently Assistant Curator at the Florence Griswold Museum, a museum dedicated to American art in Old Lyme, Connecticut. Since the FGM is located at the site of an historic artists' colony devoted to American Impressionism, I often recall my initial exposure to Impressionism while at UD, and my first visit to Giverny while studying abroad as an undergrad. 

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  • Kristin Wittman
    Senior Financial Reporting Analyst, University of Pennsylvania

    As a CPA and Senior Financial Reporting Analyst at the University of Pennsylvania, I credit my Accounting degree for the technical skills that I apply in my daily work, and my Art History degree for providing me with the career opportunities to apply them. When I began my undergraduate studies at the University of Delaware, I sought to build a career based on my interest in furthering the arts and not-for-profit industries through business. Upon graduating in 2014, I began working in Philadelphia as an Audit Associate at public accounting firm KPMG, LLP. Because of my Art History degree, I specialized in audits of not-for-profit companies such as universities, museums, and public institutions. After two years, I was promoted to Senior Audit Associate and, in 2017, I left KPMG to begin my role in the Office of the Comptroller at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Every stage of my career thus far has been enabled or enhanced by my background in Art History. As an undergraduate student, my Art History professors challenged me to communicate and interpret my thoughts and the thoughts of others in a way that felt similar to translating foreign languages. Their teachings prompted me to develop communication, persuasion, research, and analytical skills that rounded out my technical business studies. Having since developed relationships with corporate recruiters while at UD, clients at KPMG, and industry professionals at Penn, I have discovered that my Art History degree and the accompanying skills have differentiated me from my peers and made a lasting impression on the professional communities I have joined.

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  • Megan Kuck
    Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

    ​As Program Coordinator at The Phillips Collection's Center for the Study of Modern Art, a large part of my job is planning the Center's programs and representing the Center to our constituents. The programs include an annual symposium, a distinguished lecture series featuring notable artists, critics, scholars and collectors, and a series of informal talks called "Conversations with Artists" that provide an opportunity for the public to hear from innovative artists. I double majored in Art History and a language (French), something that I would advise students to do if they are interested in an art career. I also highly recommend seeking internships with a local museum or art center. In addition to my internships, I credit the exceptional instruction and guidance of UD's Art History faculty for my success at The Phillips Collection. The seminars and research opportunities made available by the Department prepared me to contribute to the Center program's agenda in ways I never would have expected. I feel very fortunate to be part of such a prestigious museum. I also feel privileged to meet and work with some of the artists and scholars that at one point I studied. In a time when the humanities are not receiving as much credit as they deserve, I adamantly say that majoring in a field such as art history truly prepares you for professional life, providing analytic and practical skill sets that are invaluable regardless of where your path may lead you after college.​

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  • Amanda Shields
    Associate Registrar, Brandywine River Museum of Art

    For the past two years I’ve been working as Associate Registrar at the Brandywine River Museum of Art.  My responsibilities range from managing the incoming loans and gallery changes to inventorying and condition reporting works of art.  I also manage the digitization project of our fine art collection to our new online database and collections management system.  Before that, I was the Curator of Fine Art and Registrar at the Chemical Heritage Foundation (soon to be Science History Institute). My collections interest began when I earned my bachelor’s degrees in art history and art conservation from the University of Delaware in 2007. From there I started my tenure at the Chemical Heritage Foundation as image archivist, maintaining and cataloging the photographic collections as well as assisting with the development of CHF’s first permanent exhibition, Making Modernity.  I then moved to completing the first digital archive at CHF with the help of my team of interns in the Center for Contemporary History and Policy. While working as Curator of Fine Art and Registrar at CHF, I completed my master’s degree in museum studies from Johns Hopkins University as well as co-curated the temporary exhibition, Books of Secrets.

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  • Nicole Cook
    Project Coordinator for Academic Partnerships, Philadelphia Museum of Art

    ​In September 2017, I started working at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in the newly created position of Project Coordinator for Academic Partnerships. In this role, I help to expand and foster the Museum's relationships with art history graduate programs at colleges and universities in the greater Philadelphia region. One of our primary goals in developing strong partnerships with local art history departments is to provide emerging art historians with crucial training in object-based study and encourage interest in collections-directed research. One of our major initiatives is a partnership with the Department of the History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania, generously supported by a joint grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The grant facilitates a variety of activities, including seminars co-taught by professors and curators, graduate fellowships and internships, and object-based study workshops. The central importance of the object in art historical inquiry is a mindset and a skill that I first developed while earning my B.F.A. in studio arts. Among the faculty and students of University of Delaware's Art History Department, I discovered a like-minded dedication to object-based study, bolstered by strong ties with UD's Department of Art Conservation and Center for Material Culture Studies. My former advisor H. Perry Chapman provided, along with her incredible dedication to teaching and mentoring, a model of a scholar who balances interests in academe and museums, something shared by many of the faculty in the department. In my own scholarship, I continue to begin with the work of art first and foremost. I am currently developing my dissertation on late-seventeenth-century Dutch artist Godefridus Schalcken into a book manuscript titled Nocturnal Visual Culture in the Dutch Golden Age: Godefridus Schalcken and the Rise of Candlelight Painting and continuing my research into the interconnected history of the rise of a new nocturnal culture in seventeenth-century Europe and concurrent artistic developments in picturing the nighttime in art.

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  • Kristel Smentek
    Associate Professor of History, Theory and Criticism, Department of Architecture, MIT

    ​Kristel Smentek earned her M.A. in Art History from the University of Delaware in 1996 and her Ph.D. in 2008. The following year, she won the Council of Graduate Schools/UMI Distinguished Dissertation Award in the Humanities and Fine Arts, generally acknowledged to be the nation's most prestigious honor for doctoral dissertations. Appointed to MIT's faculty in 2008, Smentek is a historian of eighteenth-century European visual culture, with specializations in the history of collecting, the art market, and the European encounter with Asia. She is the author of Mariette and the Science of the Connoisseur in Eighteenth-Century Europe (Ashgate, 2014).

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  • Anna Marley
    Curator of Historical American Art and Director of the Center for the Study of the American Artist at PAFA

    ​One of my favorite stories about my transition from being a graduate student in Art History at the University of Delaware to becoming a full curator at PAFA, the US's oldest art academy and museum, is of the day I drove up from Washington DC, where I was living, to defend my dissertation in Newark, and then immediately upon being declared a Ph.D., drove to the Philadelphia International Airport and boarded an overnight flight to Paris. From there I went directly to meet my new boss from PAFA at the back door of the Musee d'Orsay, proceeded into their vaults, speaking only in French to their registrars about Henry Tanner paintings in their collection and translating for my non-French speaking director. I wish I could say that the day ended there, but it was followed by a long French lunch and a visit to the Drouot Auction house with the then Curator of American Art from the Louvre. Finally, at long last, perhaps 36 hours after my defense, I collapsed in a French hotel room. In many ways, there is no way to train to be a curator - how do you learn to meet with wealthy collectors and feel at ease in their homes talking about art? How do you learn to negotiate international loans with institutions that may never have heard of your institution? How do you convince foundations that your projects are worth funding, and your colleagues at museum's across the country that their works of art should be on your institutions walls instead of their own? Some of these things you must learn on the fly, and by doing. However, in many ways, I feel that there are few other programs in the country that could have trained me as well for what I now do then the program at the University of Delaware. At UD I continued to hone the language skills I had been developing since childhood, expanding beyond French and Italian to include knowledge of German and rudimentary Spanish. I learned how to implement a multi pronged scholarly project - the dissertation - which required fundraising and networking skills to execute. I benefited from the mentorship of outstanding faculty members and alums, and the brilliance and support of my fellow students, many of whom remain friends and colleagues. The connections with objects, institutions, and people I made in my 6 years as a UD graduate student only continue to deepen and strengthen over the years, and I am happy to say that since 2009 I have taught and mentored multiple UD art history and Winterthur students through PAFA's outstanding collection as visitors, students, interns, and assistants. 

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  • Kelly Baum
    Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Curator of Contemporary Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Kelly Baum holds both a Ph.D. and an M.A. in Art History from the University of Delaware. She was appointed Curator of Postwar and Contemporary Art in the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Department of Modern and Contemporary Art in 2015 and is now the Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Curator of Contemporary Art. She previously served as the Haskell Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Princeton University Art Museum, where she was the founding curator of the museum's department of modern and contemporary art.

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  • Franklin Kelly
    Deputy Director and Chief Curator, National Gallery of Art

    Franklin ​Kelly earned a Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Delaware in 1985, where he was awarded the Sypherd Prize for his outstanding dissertation in the humanities. He has worked at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, and has taught at Princeton University and the University of Maryland, College Park. Since 2008 he has been Deputy Director and Chief Curator of​ the National Gallery of Art in Washington. (Photograph by Karen Jordan)

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  • Department of Art History
  • University of Delaware
  • 318 Old College
  • Newark, DE 19716 USA
  • Phone: 302-831-8415
  • arthistory@udel.edu